Story Teller (Marshall Cavendish)

A Tribute to the Collection of the World's Best Children's Stories Published by Marshall Cavendish

Synposes: Little Story Teller/Part 8

If You’re Happy and You Know it
Clap your hands, stamp your feet … anything goes with this song!

Leroy’s Journey
The Magic Mountain lion travels far and wide with his friends Digby and Spot. Listen to Leroy’s story and see where the journey ends.

The Ostrich
Listen to the poem, look at the picture, and make your arms and fingers into the animals mentioned.

The Lion who couldn’t Roar
When the little lion goes into the forest in search of his roar, which of the other animals plays a trick on him to help him find it? © Hilda Carson, first published by Penguin in Stories for Under-5s.

Tumbledown Town
Morris and Doris sing about the other side of Magic Mountain.

Over the Hills and Far Away
Sing along with the bright happy tune of Tom the piper’s son.

The Musicians of Bremen
Gillian Denton retells the classic adventure of four animal friends on their way to join the town band. An easy-to-read-aloud version of the story is given on the page.

Playing Animals
Children love to pretend to be their favourite animals. This rhyme offers some easy ways of enjoying the game.

Pete the Fire-engine
Ian Purdy tells the tale of a little fire-engine who finally get his big chance. Listen to the tape and see if you can imitate the sounds.

The Digby Ditty
Help Morris and Doris sing their song about the Magic Mountain robot.

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Writer, editor, web designer.

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This entry was posted on 12 October, 2009 by in Synopses.
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