Story Teller (Marshall Cavendish)

A Tribute to the Collection of the World's Best Children's Stories Published by Marshall Cavendish

Synopses: ST1/Part 25

Folk Tales of the World
Little Red Riding Hood
“Who’s afraid of the big, bad wolf?” asks the song. And the answer must surely be: the dozens of generations of children who have listened to the story of Red Riding Hood since it first appeared in print, in 1697.

Classic Fairy Stories
The Happy Prince
Oscar Wilde is better known for his sarcasm and wit than for his fairy tales, but this beautiful story reveals the gentler side of his character. It was first published in 1888 and has been a family favourite ever since.

Comic Heroes
Aldo in Arcadia (Part 5)
In this latest adventure from the pen of John Sheridan, Vacuum takes Aldo and Princess for a ride, and they meet up with an old friend – the Man in the Moon.

Tales of Today
Mr Miacca
Tommy Grimes could no more stop himself going around the corner than Jack could resist climbing the beanstalk. So, as Joseph Jacobs relates, it’s as well he kept his wits about him in a very tight spot indeed.

Cartoon Heroes
The Great Pie Contest
The heroic deeds of little Wee Puff are justly celebrated in this whimsical tale by school teacher L.E. Snellgrove.

Great Myths and Legends
Stolen Thunder
When Thor’s hammer is stolen by the Giants, revenge is swift and terrible. In some versions of this Old Norse myth, Thor himself destroys the giant Din, but in Geraldine Jones’ humorous account, the blow is struck by Odin, King of the Gods.

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This entry was posted on 3 October, 2009 by in Synopses.
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