Story Teller (Marshall Cavendish)

A Tribute to the Collection of the World's Best Children's Stories Published by Marshall Cavendish

Synopses: ST1/Part 24

Tales of Today
I Wish, I Wish
A poor little Italian girl and a rich American lady find common ground in their love of art and cats. Lisl Weil’s story, set in Florence, was first published by Haughton Mifflin Co. in America, and in Britain by Blackie & Sons.

Famous Fables
Counting  Chickens
Numerous versions of this cautionary tale are told throughout the world. In one of Aesop’s fables, it is a foolish milkmaid who daydreams about fame and fortune. But this version describes her modern counterpart in the Middle East.

The Magic World of Animals
A Hedgehog Learns to Fly
Even hedgehogs can be armchair travellers, as Rosalind Carreck’s retelling of an original story by Georgie Adams makes clear. But when Prickles makes a balloon, he soon learns to be grateful that what goes up must come down!

Classic Fairy Stories
The Little Tin Soldier
Artist Francis Phillipps makes a very special contribution to one of his favourite stories – Hans Christian Andersen’s bittersweet tale of the toy soldier who fell in love with a princess.

Folk Tales of the World
Kingdom of the Seals
Eric Maple, an author who delights in retelling the folk tales and legends of the world, here puts his pen to work in defence of an endangered species.

Cartoon Heroes
Aldo in Arcadia (Part 4)
Story Teller’s most popular cartoon hero returns to save a drowning man – with a little help from Vaccum, Uncle Emo, and their creators, John Sheridan and Malcolm Livingstone.

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This entry was posted on 3 October, 2009 by in Synopses.
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